Provincials

Rev. François C. Nagot Rev. Joseph Paul Dubreul
Rev. Jean-Marie Tessier Rev. Alphonse Magnien
Rev. Louis Regis Deluol Rev. Edward R. Dyer
Rev. François Lhomme Rev. John F. Fenlon

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nagot_port_smRev. François C. Nagot, P.S.S. , Papers (Born: 1734, Tours, France; Superior, U.S. Sulpicians, 1791-1810; Died: 1816, Baltimore, MD). Size: 1 records storage box and 2 letterbooks; date span: c. 1791-1816. Fr. Nagot is recognized as the founder of the Society of St. Sulpice in the United States. He was superior of the first group of Sulpicians sent to the United States in 1791 to open the nation’s first Roman Catholic seminary, St. Mary’s in Baltimore. In addition to his duties as superior and faculty member at the seminary, he served as a counsellor to Abp. John Carroll. In 1806 he founded the short-lived Our Lady of Pigeon Hill, the first minor seminary, in Adams County, Pennsylvania. He authored a well-regarded biography of Rev. Jean-Jacques Olier, founder of the Sulpicians, and was recognized as a distinguished master of the spiritual life. At his death in 1816 he was noted among his contemporaries for his deep piety and mystical qualities. This collection contains both official and personal papers, including account books, canonical documents, correspondence, memoirs, naturalization papers, manuscripts, records relating to Bohemia Manor and Pigeon Hill, and photocopies from other archives pertaining to his life in France. See also Sulpician letterbooks 2 and 4 for official copies of outgoing correspondence, as well as photocopies of correspondence on deposit in the Sulpician Archives in Paris.

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tessier_port_smRev. Jean-Marie Tessier, P.S.S., Papers (Born: 1758, Chapelle-Blanche, France; Superior, U.S. Sulpicians, 1810-1829; Died: 1840, Baltimore, MD). Size: 5 records storage boxes, .5 document case, and 5 letterbooks; date span: c. 1800-1829. Fr. Tessier was a founding member of the U.S. Sulpician community. He taught theology at St. Mary’s Seminary and was named Superior in 1810. He worked closely with members of the St. Dominguan (Haitian) black refugee population, conducting catechism classes and ministering to the faith community that worshiped at St. Mary’s seminary chapel. In addition to his duties at the seminary, he served as Vicar General to the first four archbishops of Baltimore.  This collection contains both official and personal papers, including correspondence, account books and journals, diary, and theological writings. See also Sulpician letterbooks 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 for official copies of outgoing correspondence, as well as photocopies of correspondence on deposit in the Sulpician Archives in Paris.

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deluol_port_smRev. Louis Regis Deluol, P.S.S., Papers (Born: 1787, St. Privat, France; Superior, U.S. Sulpicians, 1829-1849; Died: 1858, Paris, France). Size: 7 document cases and 4 letterbooks; date span: c. 1817-1858. Fr. Deluol served as Professor of Theology, Philosophy, Sacred Scripture, and Hebrew, as well as Treasurer, before being named Superior of St. Mary’s in 1829, a position he held until 1849 when he was recalled to France. He held the confidence of the Archbishops of Baltimore, serving as Vicar General for two, and played an active role in the seven Provincial Councils held between 1829-1849. He also acted as Superior of the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph’s and negotiated their alliance with the French Daughters of Charity. He was noted for the American innovations he promoted within Baltimore’s Sulpician community. The Archives was able to obtain a copy of the diary he maintained over his priestly ministry, which has been translated. The remainder of his collection is comprised administrative and personal papers and  correspondence. See also Sulpician letterbooks 1, 3, 4, and 6 for official copies of outgoing correspondence, as well as photocopies of correspondence on deposit in the Sulpician Archives in Paris.

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lhomme_port_smRev. François Lhomme, P.S.S. , Papers (Born: 1794, Brionde, France; Superior, U.S. Sulpicians, 1850-1860; Died: 1860, Baltimore, MD). Size: 1 records storage box, .5 document case, 1 volume, and 2 letterbooks; date span: c. 1827-1860. Fr. Lhomme taught and served as an administrator at St. Mary’s College (1799-1852) before being appointed superior of the U.S. Sulpicians in 1850. He oversaw the closing of the college in 1852 and devoted his attention to the development of the Sulpician minor seminary, St. Charles College (1848-1969). This collection contains both official and personal papers, including the Superior’s diary, accounts, appointments, canonical documents, correspondence, deeds, diary, journals, naturalization papers, petitions,  and theological manuscripts. See also Sulpician letterbooks 4 and 5 for official copies of outgoing correspondence.

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dubreul_port_smRev. Joseph Paul Dubreul, P.S.S., Papers (Born: 1814, St. Etienne, France; Superior, U.S. Sulpicians, 1860-1878; Died: 1878, Baltimore, MD). Size: 4 records storage boxes; date span: c. 1860-1878. Rev. Dubreul was sent to Baltimore in 1850, where he was named Vice President of St. Mary’s College and served on its faculty. After the college closed he was transferred to St. Mary’s Seminary where he was appointed Treasurer and taught Pastoral Theology and Canon Law. In 1860 he was named Superior, a position he held for the next 18 years. It was Rev. Dubreul who oversaw the construction of the larger and grander seminary building that replaced the original One Mile Tavern. He held the confidence of the Archbishops of Baltimore and served as Vicar General under Abp. James R. Bayley and Card. James Gibbons. This collection contains both official and personal papers, including appointments, circular letters, conference papers, death notice, diary, faculties, last will and testament, and subject index to one of Abp. Ambrose Maréchal’s letterbooks.

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magnien_port_smRev. Alphonse Magnien, P.S.S., Papers (Born: 1837, Le Bleymard, France; Superior, U.S. Sulpicians, 1878-1902; Died: 1902, Baltimore, MD). Size: 3 records storage boxes and 1 document case; date span: c. 1865-1902. Rev. Magnien volunteered to serve in Baltimore after hearing Fr. Dubreul give a series of talks at his seminary in Orleans. He arrived in 1869 and was assigned to the faculty of St. Mary’s, where he taught Liturgy, Scripture, and Dogma. In 1878 he was chosen to succeed Rev. Dubreul. The U.S. Sulpicians experienced tremendous growth under his superiorship, agreeing to staff seminaries in Boston, New York, and San Francisco and founding the first U.S. Solitude. He held the confidence of Card. James Gibbons, serving as his secretary and theologian. Like his predecessor Rev. Deluol, Rev. Magnien was a vigorous Americanizer, who eventually became caught up in the Americanist controversy. This collection contains both official and personal papers, including canonical documents, correspondence, diary, faculties, reports, photographs, and publications.

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dyer_bw_smRev. Edward R. Dyer, P.S.S., Papers (Born: 1854, Washington, D.C.; Superior, U.S. Sulpicians, 1902-1903; Vicar General, U.S. Sulpicians, 1903-1921; Provincial, U.S. Sulpicians, 1922-1925; Died: 1925, Baltimore, MD). Size: 11 records storage boxes and 5 document cases; date span: c. 1874-1925. Rev. Dyer has the distinction of being both the first native-born American to be appointed Superior of the U.S. Sulpician community and the first U.S. Provincial. He attended St. Charles College and St. Mary’s Seminary. He was sent to Paris to complete his training, where he entered the Sulpicians. He was ordained in 1880. He was sent to Rome to pursue graduate studies at the Minerva, but was recalled to Baltimore in 1884 before taking a degree. He was assigned to St. Mary’s, where he served until 1896 when he was appointed superior of St. Joseph Seminary, Yonkers, New York. He was named superior of the U.S. Sulpician community in 1902. Fr. Dyer saw the U.S. Sulpicians through the difficult years following the Americanist and Modernist controversies, the Society’s withdrawal from seminaries in the Archdioceses of Boston and New York, and the destruction of St. Charles College, Ellicott City, MD, through fire in 1911. This collection contains both official and personal papers, including public addresses, class notes, correspondence, diary, educational matters, family records, legal documents, liturgical notes, meditations, photographs, publications, and theological writings. Of special interest to researchers are the records relating to Fr. Dyer’s role in the establishment of the National Catholic Education Association and his role as secretary-treasurer for the Commission for Catholic Missions among the Colored People and the Indians.

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fenlon_john_web Rev. John F. Fenlon, P.S.S., Papers (Born: 1873, Chicago, IL; Provincial, U.S. Sulpicians, 1925-1943; Died: 1943, Delvin Grove, MI). Size: 9 records storage boxes and 5 document cases; date span: c. 1897-1943. Rev. Fenlon attended St. Mary’s Seminary and was ordained for the Archdiocese of Chicago in 1896. After serving at Holy Name Cathedral for two years, he entered the Society of St. Sulpice and was sent to Rome to earn his S.T.D. at the Minerva. Upon completing his degree, he was sent to Issy, France, where he made his Solitude. His first assignment as a Sulpician was to the faculty of St. Joseph Seminary in Dunwoodie, NY, where he taught Sacred Scripture. In 1904 he was sent to Washington, D.C., to serve as superior for the first U.S. Solitude, St. Austin’s College. He was appointed the president of Divinity College of The Catholic University of America in 1911, a position he held for the next 13 years when he was appointed superior of the Sulpician Seminary in Washington, D.C. During the First World War he served as secretary of the Administrative Committee of the National Catholic War Council and, later, National Catholic Welfare Conference, where he played an influential behind-the-scenes role in its organization and development. In 1925 he was appointed the second provincial of the U.S. Sulpician community and the eighth superior of St. Mary’s Seminary, a position he held until his death in 1943. He oversaw the fundraising campaign and construction of the Roland Park campus of St. Mary’s Seminary, which stands as a memorial of his devotion to the work of St. Sulpice in this country. This collection contains both official and personal papers, including correspondence, administrative and subject files, and photographs. Of special interest to researchers are the records relating to his work with the National Catholic War Council.

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