Additional Resources – Online

ATLA LibGuides

Atla Religion LibGuides is a growing, selective, annotated collection of web resources for the study of religion.

OADTL

Open Access Digital Theological Library (OADTL) curates high-quality content in religious studies and related disciplines from publisher websites, institutional repositories, scholarly societies, archives, and stable public domain collections.

ONLINE RESOURCES FOR BIBLICAL STUDIES

Note: the appearance of these sites on this list does not mean that St. Mary’s Seminary and University endorse all the content on the sites.
The Bible Online
o http://www.biblegateway.com (multiple versions and languages)
o https://www.blueletterbible.org (multiple versions)
o http://unbound.biola.edu (multiple versions and languages)
o https://www.stepbible.org (multiple versions plus original languages; created by Tyndale House, a biblical studies research institute in Cambridge, England)
o https://www.esv.org/gnt (ESV, Tyndale Greek New Testament, interlinear)
o http://www.usccb.org/bible (NABRE)
o https://netbible.org (NET Bible and others)
o http://bible.oremus.org (NRSV)
o https://lectionary.library.vanderbilt.edu (NRSV texts for all Sundays of the three-year Revised Common Lectionary)
o https://www.sbl-site.org/educational/BibleTexts_nologin.aspx (downloadable Hebrew Bible, Greek New Testament, Vulgate, and Septuagint texts, but only for members of the Society of Biblical Literature)
o https://www.academic-bible.com/en/online-bibles/about-the-online-bibles (Hebrew Bible, Greek New Testament, Septuagint, Vulgate, ESV, NET Bible; at the German Bible Society site)
o https://www.nestle-aland.com/en/read-na28-online (Greek New Testament, Nestle-Aland 28th edition)
o http://sblgnt.com (The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition)

Articles, Journals, Books, and Dissertations
Platforms available through most theological libraries: ATLA, EBSCO, JSTOR
For books, dissertations, and articles:
o http://books.google.com (books)
o https://scholar.google.com (books, articles, dissertations.)
o The publisher Brill allows authors to make their work freely available online (“Brill Open Access“)
o An abridged version of The SBL Handbook of Style: https://www.sbl-site.org/assets/pdfs/pubs/SBLHSsupp2015-02.pdf

Various Sites for Biblical Studies
o The African American Lectionary: http://www.theafricanamericanlectionary.org
o The Atla Websites on Religion: Biblical Literature: https://atla.libguides.com/WOR/biblical-literature
o Best Commentaries: https://www.bestcommentaries.com
o Bible Odyssey: https://www.bibleodyssey.org (from the Society of Biblical Literature)
o Biblical Studies Online: https://biblicalstudiesonline.wordpress.com
o Biblical Weblinks: http://www.biblicalweblinks.com/wiki/About
o The British Library’s EThOS E-theses Online Service: https://ethos.bl.uk/Home.do
o The Catholic Biblical Association of America: https://www.catholicbiblical.org/links
o Electronic New Testament Educational Resources (E.N.T.E.R.): http://catholic-resources.org/Bible
o The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary: https://www.bibleodyssey.org/tools/harper-collins-dictionary
o New Testament Gateway: http://www.ntgateway.com (Prof. Mark Goodacre, Duke)
o The NTWrightPage: http://ntwrightpage.com
o Oxford Biblical Studies Online: http://www.oxfordbiblicalstudies.com
o PQDT Open provides free access to the PDF files of dissertations and theses: https://pqdtopen.proquest.com/search.html
o ProQuest is a fee-based provider of access to dissertations and theses: http://www.proquest.com/products-services/pqdtglobal.html
o Resource Pages for Biblical Studies: http://www.torreys.org/bible
o The Text This Week: http://www.textweek.com
o Tyndale House Cambridge Online Resources: http://legacy.tyndale.cam.ac.uk/online-resources

o The University of Calgary’s Religious Studies Web Guide: Biblical Studies: https://library.ucalgary.ca/c.php?g=698151&p=4955280

Other Lists and Links
Prof. Steve Walton: Free NT Resources Master List in response to COVID-19; also here is a note about free access to certain resources from Logos:
https://academic.logos.com/free-nt-resources-master-list-in-response-to-covid-19/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_content=2020-03-20-free-nt-resources-covid19&utm_campaign=promo-logospro2020&fbclid=IwAR1n_s4q_7D-qXDKUXhw3eO311OvIkz7eiUd9suzDgEfjuo_cqtaxZUYaDY

Theology on the Web (Rob Bradshaw’s Site)
Theology on the Web provides access to over 40,000 articles and books, which are all free-to-download for educational purposes.
” 90+ theological journals hosted in whole or in part
” Sets of biblical commentaries
” Bibliographies of theologians with links to online material
” Biographies of notable missionaries
” Heresies and sects of the Early Church
” Interviews with Bible College faculty members from around the world

              Subsets
https://biblicalarchaeology.org.uk
https://biblicalstudies.org.uk
https://theologicalstudies.org.uk
https://missiology.org.uk
https://earlychurch.org.uk
https://medievalchurch.org.uk
https://reformationchurch.org.uk


eBook Download Instructions for Mobile Devices

How to download an eBook with your mobile device

 

eBooks can be downloaded to your mobile device and read with the free Bluefire Reader app.

You will need the following:

  • Bluefire Reader App (Installed on your Apple, Android or Kindle Fire device)
  • An Adobe ID
  • Safari Web Browser (Apple device users)

Note for Apple Device Users:  Pop-ups must be allowed in the settings for the Safari web browser as the downloaded eBook file opens in a new tab before opening in the Bluefire app.

 

Install Bluefire Reader App

Download the Bluefire Reader App from your device’s app store:

 

Create an Adobe ID

If you have previously created an Adobe ID to download and read EBSCO eBooks with Adobe Digital Editions on your desktop computer, you already have an Adobe ID you can use to authorize the Bluefire app.

Note: You must authorize the Bluefire app with your Adobe ID.

 

Authorize Bluefire App with your Adobe ID

Before you download an eBook to Bluefire, you must authorize the app with your Adobe ID.

Please note: You will only need to authorize the BlueFire app with your Adobe ID once. After this has been done, you will only need to tap Download any time you wish to download and read an eBook on your device.

To Authorize the App:

  1. Open the Bluefire app from your device’s applications menu.
  2. Enter your Adobe ID and password in the fields provided.
  3. Tap Authorize.Authorize Bluefire App

Your device is now authorized to read EBSCO eBooks.

 

Checkout and Download an eBook on an Apple Device

Next, locate an eBook you wish to download to your device and use the following steps to download it.

To download an eBook:

  1. Use the Safari browser to search your institution’s eBook Collection on EBSCOhost.Note: Pop-ups must be allowed in the settings for the Safari web browser as the downloaded eBook file opens in a new tab before opening in the Bluefire app.
  2. Tap the Download link for the eBook you would like to download.If you are not logged into your personal My EBSCOhost folder, you are prompted to do so.

    Download link

  3. Select a Download duration from the drop-down menu.
  4. If multiple formats are available (PDF or EPUB), select the desired format, indicate that you have Bluefire Reader or an equivalent app installed and tap the Download button.Choose eBook format

    The eBook is added to the Checkout area of your My EBSCOhost folder and begins to download to your device.

  5. Once the eBook downloads, tap Open in Bluefire Reader to open the file. From there you can view your library or begin reading the eBook.click Read Now to begin reading

You may now begin reading the eBook on your device.

Note:

  • After your eBook checkout expires, the eBook file is still be on your device but can not be opened. You must remove the file manually by opening Bluefire and selecting to remove it from your library.

 

Checkout and Download an eBook on an Android Device

Next, locate an eBook you wish to download to your device and use the following steps to download it.

To download an eBook:

  1. Use your device’s web browser to search your institution’s eBook Collection on EBSCOhost.
  2. Tap the Download link for the eBook you would like to download.If you are not logged into your personal My EBSCOhost folder, you are prompted to do so.

    Download link

  3. Select a Checkout period from the drop-down menu.
  4. If multiple formats are available (PDF or EPUB), select the desired format and tap the Checkout & Download button.Choose eBook format

    The eBook is added to the Checkout area of your My EBSCOhost folder and begins to download to your device.

  5. After the download has finished, tap the downloaded eBook file from the pull-down menu at the top of your device’s screen or from the Downloads area.tap downloaded eBook file
  6. Once the downloaded eBook opens in Bluefire, tap to view your library or begin reading the eBook.click Read Now to begin reading

Note:

  • After your eBook checkout expires, the eBook file is still be on your device but can not be opened. You must remove the file manually by opening Bluefire and selecting to remove it from your library.


Rev. Dennis J. Billy, C.Ss.R.


Robert F. Leavitt Distinguished Service Professor of Theology

Director of Spiritual Life Programs

dbilly [at] stmarys.edu
Office: 410/864-4194

Curriculum vitae

 Fr. Dennis Billy, C.Ss.R. serves as professor of moral theology and spirituality and is holder of the Robert F. Leavitt Distinguished Service Chair in Theology at St. Mary’s. From 1988 to 2008 he taught at the Alphonsian Academy of Rome’s Pontifical Lateran University and is now a Professor Emeritus of that institution. From 2008 to 2016 he was scholar-in-residence, professor, and holder of the John Cardinal Krol Chair of Moral Theology at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, Overbrook in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania. He also serves as Fellow and Karl Rahner Professor of Catholic Studies at the Graduate Theological Foundation in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Fr. Billy is an American Redemptorist of the Baltimore Province. He comes from Staten Island, New York, and was educated there through high school in local Catholic schools. He holds an A.B. in English from Dartmouth College (Hanover, New Hampshire) and studied for the priesthood in the Redemptorist seminary system. After his priestly training, he went on to earn a Th.D. in Church History from Harvard Divinity School, an M.A. in Medieval Studies from the University of Toronto, an M.M.R.Sc. in Moral Theology from the Katholieke Universiteit of Leuven in Belgium, an S.T.D. in Spirituality from The Pontifical University of St. Thomas (Angelicum, Rome), and a D.Min. in Spiritual Direction from the Graduate Theological Foundation. 

Fr. Billy has authored more than 40 books and published over 400 articles in a variety of scholarly and popular journals. He is also very active in retreat work and in the ministry of spiritual direction. Fr. Billy serves on the staff at Notre Dame Retreat House in Canandaigua, NY. In 2017, he was awarded a three-year grant by the Templeton World Charity Foundation to develop a program on the topic “Spiritual Direction and the Moral Life.”

Selected Courses Taught

  • Medical Ethics
  • Marriage, Sexuality, and Celibacy
  • Spiritual Direction and the Moral Life
  • Fundamentals in Moral Theology

Service to the Church

  • Staff member of Notre Dame Retreat House, Canandaigua, New York
  • Spiritual director
  • Clergy workshops
  • Priests retreats
  • Sisters retreats

Selected Publications

  • Returning Home: A Spirituality of the Christian Journey (En Route, 2020)
  • The Meaning of the Eucharist: Voices from the Twentieth Century (En Route, 2019)
  • Jesus and the Last Things: Death, Judgment, Heaven, Hell (Wipf and Stock, 2019)
  • Finding Our Way to God: Spiritual Direction and the Moral Life (Liguori, 2018)
  • Going Beyond the Wound: A Spirituality for Men (New City, 2018)
  • Jesus, the New Adam: Humanity’s Steadfast Hope (Wipf and Stock, 2017)
  • Meeting Jesus on the Road to Emmaus: An Invitation to Friendship, Eucharist and Christian Community (Twenty-Third, 2017)
  • Follow Him and Reclaim the World (Liguori, 2016)
  • Mary in 3-D: Icon of Discipleship, Doctrine, and Devotion (New City, 2015)
  • The Mystery of the Eucharist: Voices from the Saints and Mystics (New City, 2014)
  • The Cloud of Unknowing (Liguori, 2014)
  • Tending the Mustard Seed: Living the Faith in Today’s World (New City, 2013)
  • The “Our Father:” A Prayer’s Power to Touch Hearts (Liguori, 2012)
  • Living in the Gap: Religious Life and the Call to Communion (New City, 2nd ed., 2014)
  • Contemplative Ethics: An Introduction (Paulist, 2011)
  • The Beauty of the Eucharist: Voices from the Church Fathers (New City, 2010)

Online Resources

Recommended Reading

  • Francis de Sales, Introduction to the Devout Life
  • Alphonsus de Liguori, The Practice of the Love of Jesus Christ
  • John Henry Newman, Apologia Pro Vita Sua
  • C.S. Lewis, The Four Loves
  • Thomas Merton, Seven Storey Mountain

A Favorite Quotation

The paradise of God is the heart of man.

— St. Alphonsus de Liguori, The Way to Converse Always and Familiarly with God


At- Risk groups of the World

Click here to return to “Student Projects.”

This explanation was the basis for teaching a religion class in our school to raise awareness of this issue.

At- Risk groups of the World

In this world, there are many groups of people who are in poor situations and are often taken advantage of. One of these groups is Migrant Workers. Here are two short excerpts describing this group:

1.         Every day and on all parts of the planet, people are falling victim to human trafficking. One of the worst examples of this is with migrant workers. People can become migrant workers through many situations, but the root cause is often trickery. People can be lured into a system that takes advantage of them simply by being offered a better life. This system usually targets the vulnerable, such as the poor or those in war torn areas, by promising them well paying, legitimate jobs in foreign countries. Unfortunately, they use tactics such as charging hefty commissions for being given the opportunity to have a job to draw these people into debt. Once this occurs, there is often no way for the workers to escape the system. The people who are part of the system controlling the workers often also lie about how low the wage actually is, so with every year the money the workers earn is not enough to live off of. As a result, they must borrow more money and fall deeper into debt just to survive. With situations like these occurring every day, migrant workers are a very serious group of human trafficking.

2.         When migrant workers and their children become entrapped in the yearly cycle of working hard on a farm, receiving meagerly wages, then migrating to another plantation to start it all again, not only do the parents suffer, but the children as well. According to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, a child must be 14 years old to lawfully be able to work (outside of school hours) in any profession, except for agriculture, in the United States. The Labor Act also reads that children 12 years old and younger may work in agriculture, granted they have a parent’s permission. In addition to this Federal law, there are various state laws which further restrict the hours that one as a minor is able to work; however, there is always a disparity between the hour limit in agricultural lines of work as opposed to other jobs. What this often leads to is a higher dropout rate among migrant children and teens as they find coping with the workload in high school very difficult to balance with their work. For these children, telling them to not work is almost never an option; they are often large contributors of income for their families. Instead, to help these children there should be more programs in schools which allow for the migrant student to work with teachers to better understand the materials taught; as well as make the transfer process easier to navigate so that new students may transfer with ease and resume education quickly. In order to promote this, schools should put forth programs which allows those migrant children to meet with teachers, and have small tutoring sessions where they are able to catch up on work and to assist their comprehension. For all children in the United States, the opportunity to learn is the opportunity to be successful, and this opportunity should always be an option for migrant children.

Another vulnerable group, which happens to be very susceptible to human trafficking, is impoverished Filipino children. Here is a short description of the problem they face:

3.         The Filipino population, especially children, is very vulnerable to human trafficking. The Philippines is a poor country in which human traffickers take advantage of the impoverished. Many children are susceptible to child military groups that recruit kids into armies made up of other kids. Other children and teens look for work to help make money for their families. These kids wind up in terrible working conditions and all around bad situations. Finally, many poor Filipino families sell their kids to tourists for sex acts. While this is very wrong, the families see it as a way to make money and otherwise may not be able to feed themselves. While these are a few examples of human trafficking that occur in the Philippines, many other forms of human trafficking exist. Poor Filipino men, women, and children find themselves in very tough situations each and every day, and most of the time, these Filipino people will do what they can to feed their families and themselves. The government of the Philippines has made very small efforts to try and stop human trafficking. However, the government is too corrupt and has not made enough efforts or had enough funds to stop this ever-growing problem of human trafficking. There are too many traffickers and too many impoverished people for the situation to be easily resolved. However, many groups and organizations continue to help these Filipino children and families, and the problem can still be stopped. I have researched and found out about the situation in the Philippines and have decided to spread awareness. The experience has been pretty eye opening and it is hard to imagine what these people go through compared to our easy lives.

The last at-risk group this paper focuses on is prostitutes. This paragraph focuses on their terrible situation and ways their situation could be improved. 

  1.          After researching prostitution, I’ve discovered many new things. I’ve learned about the horrible state that trafficked prostitutes live in. They live in conditions worse than the homeless, which they are, and have no life of their own. Also, while some “elective” prostitutes are able to escape the clutches of the situation, most cannot.



Support Us

Giving Opportunities

Many alums, friends and benefactors ask about gift giving opportunities at St. Mary’s Seminary and St. Mary’s Ecumenical Institute. If you are interested in making a gift, the following may be helpful to you.

Gifts can be mailed to:

Advancement Office
St. Mary’s Seminary & University
5400 Roland Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21210

For more information, contact the Advancement Office at 410.864.4264.

On-line Giving

We now gratefully accept donations to the annual fund on-line via PayPal. PayPal does not require you to have a PayPal account to donate to St. Mary’s Seminary or to St. Mary’s Ecumenical Institute.

In order to make a one-time or recurring donation,  please click the “Donate” button below. You will be asked to enter a donation amount and then click the “Update Total” button. You can either log in to PayPal or continue without logging on by following instructions on payment options which are on the left of the page.

 

Giving to the Annual Fund

The Annual Fund of both St. Mary’s Seminary and St. Mary’s Ecumenical Institute helps support ongoing operations on an annual basis. Your gifts enable us to provide the best possible programs for our seminarians and the men and women enrolled in the E.I.

Giving to Special Projects

We also seek gifts for special capital projects authorized by the Board of Trustees. In recent years, St. Mary’s Seminary & University has sponsored successful campaigns for renovations and major building projects as well as endowment campaigns in both the St. Mary’s Ecumenical Institute and the School of Theology. If you are interested in a list of current gift opportunities, please contact the Advancement Office 410-864-4262.

Many Ways of Giving to St. Mary’s

Many people don’t realize that there are a number of different ways of making a major gift. One of the following may be right for your circumstances. The Advancement Office will be pleased to assist you with any questions you have about any of the following:

THE HERITAGE SOCIETY
Building a Legacy

St. Mary’s Seminary & University established the Heritage Society in 1990 to honor alumni and friends who value our past and are committed to our present and future. By including St. Mary’s in their gift and estate plans, this special group will enable the Seminary to continue the strong tradition of academic and theological excellence which began in 1791. Gifts from your estate could also be restricted to St. Mary’s Ecumenical Institute and The Center for Continuing Formation. All three divisions of St. Mary’s Seminary & University are strengthened by the generosity of our donors.

Since 1990 St. Mary’s Seminary & University has received over $7,000,000 from 160 alumni and friends have remembered St. Mary’s in their estate plans and there are currently 165 members of the Heritage Society. St. Mary’s is grateful to those who have made this commitment and allowed this historic institution to continue to thrive now and in the future.

If you have any questions about the opportunities for giving through your estate please call our Advancement Office at 410-864-4264.

Outright Gifts

Outright giving is a popular method of making a donation to St. Mary’s because of the income tax advantages. Giving appreciated securities or property to the Seminary may entitle you to an income tax deduction for the full fair market value of the security or property, while allowing you to avoid the capital gains tax on the appreciation.

Bequests

Increasingly, more alumni and friends are remembering St. Mary’s in a personal and enduring way by naming the institution as a beneficiary in their wills. A will allows you to make a more substantial contribution than might otherwise be possible, while at the same time permitting the most flexible use of available resources during your lifetime. The following are some specific ways to include St. Mary’s in your will.

  • The most flexible way to make such a gift is to leave a percentage of your estate to St. Mary’s. By leaving 15%, for example, the gift automatically changes with the size of your estate.
  • A specific bequest allows you to designate a specific sum of cash, securities, or property to St. Mary’s. Although this type of bequest is straightforward and uncomplicated, it is not always best because the size of your estate may fluctuate. If you choose to do a specific bequest, you may need to review your will periodically to account for changes in financial status.
  • With a residual bequest, St. Mary’s receives the balance of your estate after expenses; liabilities and bequest to other beneficiaries have been fulfilled.
  • Finally, a contingent bequest would allow you to make a bequest contingent upon a specific occurrence. For example, you can make a bequest to a relative with the contingency that if the relative is deceased when your will is probated then your bequest passes to St. Mary’s.
  • With any type of bequest the key is planning ahead. You will need to enlist the help of an attorney to draw up a valid will; however, there are a few things you should do before the first visit that will help reduce time and expenses.

~Make a list of your property. This includes real estate, life insurance, securities, works of art, etc.
~Note how you would like these things allocated. Do you have any specific wishes for the property? List the people you would like to remember,


Rev. William L. Burton, OFM


Professor of Scripture

WBurton [at] stmarys.edu
Office: 410/864-4238

Curriculum vitae

Franciscan friar Fr. William Burton came to St. Mary’s Seminary & University in 2019 as professor of Scripture after teaching at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Florida. His fundamental interest as a Scripture professor is the development of exegetical skills to guide seminarians and priests in the understanding, interpretation, and preaching of Scripture. Fr. Burton says that this “serves my particular need, as a Franciscan friar, to follow my call to live the gospel.” He made his solemn religious profession in 1987 and was ordained a priest in 1989.

Fr. Burton has worked especially hard in various ways to raise the biblical literacy level of the Roman Catholic Church. He has done this in the classroom and lecture hall, and also in guiding local parish Bible groups and in leading Bible study pilgrimages to the Holy Land, Greece, Turkey, and Italy. His recently published book, Abba Isn’t Daddy and Other Biblical Surprises, attempts to engage the typical, interested Catholic lay person in the excitement of Scripture study. To this same end he has published several audio and video series on various biblical topics. He has also been a presenter at the Los Angeles Religious Education Congress.

Fr. Burton has taught Scripture for twenty years; in seminary formation work his goal is to excite within future priests and permanent deacons a deep love of Scripture. “The first hurdle I always try to make easiest for students,” he says, “is to dispel the fear so many have of studying Scripture. I’m convinced that most already have the basic skills they need to begin-they just haven’t thought of using these already acquired skills in the study of the Bible. They usually find that it is far easier than they imagined and infinitely more exciting and engaging than they thought possible.”

Selected Courses Taught

  • Introductory New Testament Greek
  • Luke-Acts
  • The Book of Revelation
  • Johannine Literature
  • Jesus at Table

Service to the Church

  • Second term as Provincial Councilor of Franciscan Sacred Heart Province
  • Guiding numerous parish Bible study series all over the U.S.
  • Directing clergy retreats
  • Guiding parish missions
  • Preaching based on solid Catholic exegesis of the texts

Selected Publications

  • Abba Isn’t Daddy and Other Biblical Surprises (Ave Maria Press, 2019)
  • “How to Read and Understand Luke-Acts” (CD series; Now You Know Media, 2019)
  • “The Synoptic Gospels; How to Read and Understand Matthew, Mark and Luke” (CD series; Now You Know Media, 2018)
  • “At Table with Jesus; Do this In Remembrance of Me” (CD & DVD series; Now You Know Media, 2017)
  • “Demystifying he Book of Revelation” (DVD series; Paraclete Press, 2015)

Online Resources

Recommended Reading

  • Joshua W. Jipp, Saved by Faith and Hospitality
  • Larry W. Hurtado, At the Origins of Christian Worship: The Context and Character of Earliest Christian Devotion
  • Gillian Feeley-Harnik, Lord’s Table; The Meaning of Food in Early Judaism and Christianity
  • Dennis E. Smith, From Symposium to Eucharist: The Banquet in the Early Christian World

A Favorite Quotation

In a piece about the book of Genesis, St. John wrote: “that we may come to know the ineffable loving kindness of God and see for ourselves the thought and care He has given to accommodating His language to our nature.”


COVID-19 Response and Questionnaires

St. Mary’s is restricting public access until further notice, including the Library, Archives and the Center for Continuing Formation. Seminary formation is fully onsite. St. Mary’s Ecumenical Institute classes are online only, and its staff is working remotely.

Non-resident full-time faculty and Staff Questionnaire

Resident Faculty Health Questionnaire

Seminarian Health Questionnaire

CDC Guidance

Face Masks
Social Distancing
Hand Hygiene

 
A SPECIAL MESSAGE FROM FR. PHILLIP J. BROWN, P.S.S.
PRESIDENT RECTOR
September 8, 2020

First and foremost, St. Mary’s Seminary wants to ensure everyone’s health and safety and to minimize the risk of infection.  These are very challenging times and the entire St. Mary’s Seminary Community joins in prayer for all who have and continue to suffer because of the COVID-19 virus.  Our work is ministry and in a very special way ministry is needed now more than ever.   Our priests in residence have prayed the same prayer every day since early in 2020 when the severity of the situation became apparent.

As we begin the new semester and have welcomed our seminarian community back to campus we have instituted a number of policies to ensure everyone’s health and safety and to minimize the risk of infection.  All returning seminarians were screened by Mercy Medical Center upon arrival and before entering the building.  The seminarian community will live in residence and all classes will be held in person with the option for online attendance as needed.  St. Mary’s Ecumenical Institute classes are being held online for the fall semester.

Seminarians and resident faculty members are required to complete a health assessment anytime they leave campus and before they return to the building.

Staff and non-resident faculty members are required to complete a daily health assessment and an online questionnaire before entering the building.  

The following policies are in place for all until further notice:

  • Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms is restricted from entering the building
  • No overnight guests
  • No outside guests without advance permission of the Rector
  • Use of masks is required throughout the building
  • Elevators are restricted to 2 people at a time
  • The library is restricted to currently enrolled School of Theology and Ecumenical Institute students and faculty
  • All meeting rooms and classrooms have a maximum capacity listed based on current CDC health guidelines. 
  • The Archives is only available to researchers online
  • All public restrooms are single use only
  • All are expected to use the numerous sanitizing stations throughout the building and in particular after use of any classroom or meeting room

 This page will be updated on a regular basis with any new information.

 

Prayer During Pandemic

Almighty ever-living and ever-loving God,

We pray to you in times of trouble, in times of uncertainty, in scary times,

Keep in the forefront of our awareness your loving care for us, your loving care for the earth,

especially your loving care for those who suffer, those who are at risk, those who are vulnerable because of the circumstances of their lives, because of the circumstances of our time.

Keep alive in our hearts the certain knowledge that this, too, shall pass; that more normal times will return; that what becomes newly normal will help us live more safely and in ways that will make us newly aware of your presence and the importance of our presence to one another.

Comfort those who are sick; help us to find ways to comfort them.

Console those who are grieving; let us not hesitate to grieve with them; show us how to bring your love and consolation to them.

Amen

 
Health Screening Questions for Visitors

If you answer “Yes” to any of the questions below please postpone your visit.

  1. Have you had a fever of greater than 100 degrees Fahrenheit?
  2. Have you experienced abnormal coughing?
  3. Have you experienced shortness of breath or difficulty breathing?
  4. Have you had chills or repeated shaking with chills?
  5. Have you had any unusual or aggravated muscle pain?
  6. Have you had a headache that is not alleviated by typical pain killers (acetaminophen, ibuprofen, aspirin, etc.)?
  7. Have you had a nagging sore throat?
  8. Have you experienced loss of taste or smell?
  9. Have you been in close proximity or in contact with someone who exhibits symptoms or been diagnosed with COVID-19?
  10. Have you traveled to or been in direct contact with anyone who has traveled internationally?


Fragility and Hope: Practicing Medicine in a Pandemic

The May 6 Theology Town Hall featured Dr. Brian Volck and Dr. Matthew Loftus, who have practiced medicine in a variety of settings (including Baltimore city, the Navajo Reservation, South Sudan, and Kenya, among others). They reflected on practicing medicine in the time of a pandemic. Dr. Volck’s remarks are included below, or you can view the full town hall. Prior writings by Drs. Loftus and Volck on the coronavirus pandemic include the following:

Practicing Mercy 
Dr Brian Volck
One evening not long before the statewide order to shelter in place took effect, I and my wife, Jill, were climbing into bed when she asked, “Is someone knocking at our front door?” I thought I’d heard a soft voice from the sidewalk below a few minutes earlier, but now I, too, could hear a faint tapping. Upon opening the door, we found a boy about two years old dressed in pajamas and shivering in the cold night air. A slump-shouldered woman sat on the front steps. She looked up at us with heavy-lidded eyes and said, in the muffled undertone of someone who’s had far too much to drink, “We need help.” There was no one else nearby – no car, no clue why she had chosen our house. I was wary, uncertain what to do. To be honest, I was a little scared this was a setup, a ploy to get into our house for who knows what mischief. Jill, however, took one look at the child and said, “Come on in and get warm.”

We helped the mother to her feet, picked up the boy, and brought them both inside. She was clearly intoxicated. Her clothes were neither torn nor dirty, just disheveled. She was missing a shoe. There were no signs of physical trauma. The boy looked scared, staring silently at his mother, his eyes wide, his nose runny – whether from tears or a cold it was hard to tell – and the diaper under his pajamas was twisted to the side as if he’d been dressed in a hurry. In time, he stopped shaking as we talked to his mother. She said she was trying to get to the baby daddy’s house but had lost her way. She lived with her mother in another neighborhood where she said she felt safe. For some reason, though, she didn’t want to return there tonight. She had no cell phone or ID and couldn’t remember anyone’s number.

It was clear they needed what’s traditionally been called a corporal work of mercy. What wasn’t clear was how to help them. Jill and I are both physicians, but we hadn’t trained for this. We brought them something to drink, some cookies for the boy to eat, then Jill quietly stepped away to call our pastor in search of advice. He encouraged her to call the police, which she did. By the time the officer arrived, the boy was in my lap, talking to me while rubbing his snotty nose in my shirt. We were not a good example of social distancing. The police officer was annoyed at us for letting strangers in the house. Didn’t we know how dangerous Baltimore gets at night? In the end, however, he managed to trace down the mother’s mother, who quickly drove to our house to take her daughter and grandson home, thanking us profusely. The officer called Jill fifteen minutes later to say that the boy’s grandmother was grateful to have the two of them back rather than with the baby daddy, whom she described as an abusive alcoholic. “Mercy,” I said. Mercy, indeed.  

I share this story because it can help us think theologically about health care during the COVID-19 pandemic without getting lost in a thicket of biomedical details. When Jill welcomed two strangers in our living room that evening, we were making it up as we went along. Few of us like to think of our personal physician doing that with us, but many cases don’t fit the textbook descriptions. This was one such outlier. Yet we’d been practicing for these moments since our medical school days, when we formed habits essential to our profession, habits like as prudence, courage, and truthfulness. No one in our rigorously secular medical school or residencies called them virtues. No one quoted Aquinas, Alasdair MacIntyre, or Stanley Hauerwas.  Some of our mentors admonished us to leave questions of God to the hospital chaplain and refer any moral dilemmas to the ethics committee. But, in retrospect, I see all that training now through theological eyes, further refracted by my more recent formation as a lay oblate in the Benedictine monastic tradition.

I have time to name just two such habits. The first is hospitality, something that seems conspicuously absent in hospitals today. Yet, “hospitality” and “hospital” derive from the single Latin word, hospes, which can mean both “guest” and “host.” What’s more, these words share a root with the English word “hostile.” Linguists trace these surprising connections back to a Proto-Indoeuropean root *ghos-ti- , which can mean “guest,” “host,” “stranger,” and “foreigner.” This jumble of contradictory meanings also appears in the ancient Greek word xenos, from which the fourth century Byzantine xenodochia – the first true hospitals – took their name. Etymologically, then, xenophobia may be less about fearing the stranger than fearing what we, as the host, might be asked to do for her.

In most traditional cultures, hospitality is understood as a duty and a danger at the same time. Host and guest enter a relationship of mutual obligation: the host offers protection and inquires after the guest’s needs,


Remarks by Marc Cardinal Ouellet: Towards a Renewal of the Priesthood for Our Time,

Towards a Renewal of the Priesthood for Our Time

I am honored and deeply grateful to receive a doctorate in Divinity honoris causa from Saint Mary’s Seminary and University of Baltimore. In return, I offer this theological meditation as a tribute to the 225 years of service to priestly formation in United States rendered by the Society of Saint-Sulpice. My sincere Congratulations!

The organizers have kindly allowed me to choose the topic of my remarks. I had initially considered speaking to you about the Church’s reflection on the family during the last few years and about the need–which is acutely felt in our present cultural circumstance–for a nuptial outpouring of the Holy Spirit. But since this latter point is already extensively treated in the Apostolic Exhortation Amoris Laetitia, my next idea was to talk about its proper pastoral implementation. As I thought about this, I was struck by the notion that such an implementation requires a nuptial outpouring of the Holy Spirit on the other states of life as well–an outpouring needed to guarantee the convergence and coherence of the Church’s witness.

I have accordingly chosen to talk about the priesthood, given the central role it plays in any reform of the Church. Instead of approaching my topic in isolation, however, I would like to discuss it in the framework of the Trinitarian, Eucharistic, and nuptial ecclesiology whose development was launched by the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council. As the Dogmatic Constitution Lumen Gentium teaches, “[t]hough they differ from one another in essence and not only in degree, the common priesthood of the faithful and the ministerial or hierarchical priesthood are nonetheless interrelated: Each of them in its own special way is a participation in the one priesthood of Christ.” [1]

For over 25 years, I have been reflecting on this essential difference between, and mutual ordering of, the two modes of sharing in Christ’s one and only priesthood. As I see it, conciliar and post-conciliar ecclesiology has not yet fully integrated this teaching. Note, in fact, that the sentence I just cited now occurs at the end of Lumen Gentium’s section on the common priesthood, which the document treats first, in Chapter II on the People of God, in order, it seems, to safeguard the specificity of the ministerial priesthood. The sentence itself is laden with theological, pastoral, and ecumenical implications, implications that theologians have by no means exhausted, the post-conciliar boom in ecclesiology notwithstanding.

The claim of a difference in kind, and not merely in degree, [between the two modes of priesthood] has caused much ink to flow on the part of both defenders and challengers alike. The difference in question is intimately bound up with the Catholic understanding of the priesthood, which, since the Council of Trent, has been particularly concerned to refute the Protestant denial of the ordained ministry, sometimes, it must be admitted, to the detriment of the common priesthood. The Second Vatican Council re-established a certain balance in that it restored the dignity of the common priesthood while also safeguarding the irreducibility of the ministerial. This recalibration is of a piece with the dynamic development of the apostolate of the laity, the universal call to holiness, and the new awareness of mission on the part of the Church. At the same time, it also harmonizes with the Council’s ample vision of the Church as the sacrament of salvation, a vision that, as the first lines of the Constitution already make plain, connects two themes: participation in Trinitarian communion and the unity of the human race. It seems to me, however, that this comprehensive renewal in ecclesiology calls for a systematic effort to approach the priesthood in the Church in light of a renewed pneumatology and Trinitarian theology. It is just this approach that is the subject-matter of the following remarks.

I propose to begin, then, by discussing the Holy Spirit’s relationship to the priesthood of Christ in the Trinitarian economy of the Incarnation and the Paschal Mystery. I will then go on to speak about the relationship between the Holy Spirit and the priesthood in the Church in terms of nuptiality. Finally, I will say something about the ultimate foundation of the essential difference and the correlation between the two modes of participating in the one and only priesthood of Christ in the Church.[2]

I admit from the outset that my subject is not obviously in the forefront of the burning ecclesial issues of our time, and that it might seem a bit abstract, not to mention remote from the political dramas of the moment (!). I am convinced, however, that a deeper understanding of the priesthood, in its two-fold form, remains vitally important for the Church’s testimony of communion, for the nurturing of vocations, for the initial and continuing formation of priests, as well as for ecumenism and the pastoral and missionary conversion so vigorously promoted by Pope Francis for the reform of the Church.

THE HOLY SPIRIT AND THE PRIESTHOOD OF JESUS CHRIST

An important first step in our reflection is to recall the Trinitarian pattern structuring the opening of the Dogmatic Constitution Lumen Gentium, which describes both the Protagonists of, and the stages in, God’s design. The description begins thus: “The eternal Father, by a free and hidden plan of His own wisdom and goodness, created the whole world. His plan was to raise men to a participation of the divine life” (LG, 2). To this end, he sent his Son, “the image of the invisible God, the first-born of every creature” (Col 1:15), in whom we are predestined to reflect his image (Rom 8:29). And we are to do so in the communion of the Church, which has already been made manifest “by the outpouring of the Spirit” and “at the end of time .


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